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Rayanne Haines (she/her) is an award winning poet, author, educator, and cultural producer. She is the 2022 Writer in Residence for the Metro Edmonton Federation of Libraries and the author of three poetry collections - The Stories in My Skin (2013), Stained with the Colours of Sunday Morning (Inanna, 2017), and Tell The Birds Your Body Is Not A Gun (Frontenac, 2021) - as well as a four part commercial market, urban fantasy/romance series.

 

Rayanne hosts the literary podcast Crow Reads, and is the VP for the League of Canadian Poets. Her poetry and prose have been shortlisted for the Robert Kroetsch Poetry Award, Canadian Authors Association Exporting Alberta Award, the John Whyte Memorial Essay Alberta Literary Award, and the National ReLit Award for Poetry.

 

Tell the Birds Your Body Is Not A Gun won the 2022, Alberta Literary Awards, Stephan G. Stephansson Award for Poetry. 

Her flash fiction piece, Cut Lines won the 2019 University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine and Mama na Mtoto Flash Fiction Award, and is the basis for her new literary novel in progress. 

Rayanne Haines’s writing has appeared or will appear in, Minola ReviewFiddlehead, Prairie Fire, Impact: The Lives of Women After Concussion Anthology, Voicing Suicide Anthology, The Selkie Resiliency Anthology, Freefall, Wax Poetry and Arts, Funicular, Lida Lit Mag and Indefinite Space among others.

 

Rayanne is a 2019 Edmonton Artist Trust Fund Award recipient. As a Cultural Producer, her artistic practice focuses on projects that look to redeem and empower women’s narratives. 

Rayanne has taught or mentored with the Writers Guild of Alberta, The Alexander Writers Centre, Poetry in Voice, and the University of Alberta Extension. She was a previous WIR for Audreys Books.

Executive Director for the Edmonton Poetry Festival for seven years, Rayanne is currently a sessional faculty member in the Arts and Cultural Management Program at MacEwan University and holds a Masters of Arts Degree in Arts, Festival and Cultural Management from Queen Margaret University.

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